ECO-DESIGNS, FOLK HERITAGE

“MANDANA”- A DYING INDIAN ART

Mandana art is one of the oldest surviving tribal art of India. Mandana is a name given to the paintings done on wall and floor by the women of Meenas community of Madhya Pradesh and Rajasthan. Mandana are drawn to draw health and to protect the house and family from evil and welcoming gods into the house. The art is auspicious and treated as a mark of celebrations on festive occasions. Mandana is derived from the word "Mandan", meaning decoration and beautification. Historically, they have been practiced as a way of decorating ones home at the time of festivals, religious ceremonies, marriage functions and other auspicious ceremonies. The simplicity of a Mandana lies in its two colors – often red and white. The use of natural and eco-friendly materials in the art speaks about the harmonious balance between our traditions and mother nature.

FOLK HERITAGE

“KOLAM”-ART FROM SOUTH INDIA

Kolam, is an age-old floor art form originated in Tamil Nadu becoming an integral part of South Indian culture. Kolam is a symmetrical design often drawn around grid patterns of dots on the floor with rice flour. The kolam patterns are often passed on from generation to generation and women are so skilled that these patterns are drawn by bare fingers, really quickly barely making any mistakes. Kolam follows complex concepts of mathematics like symmetry and permutation. Every dot and curve is calculated offering scope for intricacy, complexity and creativity of high order.

FOLK HERITAGE

“RANGOLI” – A COLORFUL TALE FROM INDIA

Deepawali is coming, and I am searching all over the internet for new Rangoli designs which I could make at my home this diwali. I love making Rangolis ever since I was a child. The patterns, colors and the festive vibes which came along with a beautiful Rangoli, is matchless. Rangolis or chauk-poorna is a part of hindu household during poojas, rituals, auspicious ceremonies, festivals and even daily. But, it's an essential part of Diwali celebration in India. Indians are well familiar with Rangolis.... But I am sure there is lot more to know about this colorful folk art. Let's find out-

FOLK HERITAGE

“BHATUKALI”- AN ANCIENT MINIATURE KITCHEN

"Bhatukali" is a Maharashtrian legacy of displaying toy kitchen utensils in much elaborated form. It consist miniatures of traditional and ancient kitchen utensils and other stuffs which were once and still, the part of Maharashtrian household. Typical sets were copper, brass, silver but now available in wood, ceramic, steel and plastic. Bhatukali holds around 30 to 3000 kitchen articles which are worth collecting and used by kids to socialize and learn life skills in playful ways.

FOLK HERITAGE

KARAWARI CAVE FIGURES FROM PAPUA NEW GUINEA

The vast stretches of Karawari region is surrounded by dense tropical lowland rainforest are home to the traditional Arafundi semi-nomadic settlements. Karawari serves a series of caves and rock shelters inspired by the traditional beliefs of Arafundi people. They are kind of cave-people who have been using caves as their shelters, ceremonial grounds, spirit houses, as burial ground, hiding grounds and much more. Anthropologists believes the caves of the Karawari and Upper Arafundi could constitute “the greatest example of rock art in the whole of Melanesia”.